Writing at the speed of ???

I realize this is only the end of November, but I know from past years I won’t get much writing done in December, so I think I can predict this year’s work results. I certainly won’t have three ready-to-publish books as I’d hoped. I expect to end the year with one publish-ready manuscript; another stuck in revision, and one incomplete first draft.

quill

Writing, editing, revising, and polishing a manuscript in one year is a first for me. If I’d worked only on the completed romantic comedy, I’m sure I could have cut that time by a couple of months. Yet, according to indie book marketing advice, even ten months turnaround time is not competitive. Sigh.

Now, as I work through a final polish on that romantic comedy, I find myself doubting. This is my first time to write a book that falls squarely in the romance category—maybe even crossing over into older New Adult romance. It’s also my first attempt at comedy. So I guess I’m entitled to a few doubts. The coming months will show whether those doubts were justified.

Another concern about this story is whether I should publish it under a different name. My first two books are serious women’s fiction—book club fiction, if I may call it that. My half-finished manuscript will be the same. By publishing this under the same author name, would I risk receiving bad reviews from readers expecting this next book to be the same genre as the first two?

Yes, of course, the cover, book description, and preview will make it obvious this book is a different genre, but unfortunately, not all readers pay close attention before they buy. Then again, is it worth creating a pseudonym for just one book? Though I had a blast writing this one and would love to write another or more, as yet, I don’t have an idea for a second romantic comedy.

Oh well, I have time to decide. When I’m done with this polish, I’ll have to write a book description (pure torture) and create the cover—which looks fantastic in my head.

I hope you’re feeling good about the first eleven months of this year and the last month will put the cherry on top. For those of you in the U.S.—Happy Thanksgiving!

Linda

Titles and covers and blurbs, oh my!

I did not intend to blog only once last month. September just disappeared while I was busy writing. If you’re a self-publisher trying to do it all yourself, like me, maybe you’ll relate to my current predicament. Actually, even if you have a team who decides on the title, cover, and back cover copy for your books, you might sympathize—and feel fortunate.

unkbookEven though I planned for my romantic comedy to be a shorter novel than my serious women’s fiction, the first draft missed the goal by a good bit. No surprise really. I write lean, so my first drafts always fall short of the word count goal. Still, I worried I wouldn’t be able to add enough in revision. Now, I’m no longer concerned.

A successful and busy writer friend graciously offered her time to read my first draft and make some excellent suggestions. Those comments inspired me to add over 5,000 words so far. By the time I finish the first revision, I expect the word count to grow a bit more.  So, that’s all good.

Unfortunately, I still don’t have a title. The scary thing is, when I think about titles, my mind goes blank. At this stage of writing my first two novels, I’d started compiling a list of possible titles, most of them terrible, still I had something. This time I have nothing except the working title, and even though this is a rom-com, I think the working title is too cutesy.

I’m getting impatient because I want to start working on the cover, and the title is an important factor in the design. Other than knowing the cover needs to announce the book as a fun read, I have no image visualized. I fall asleep every night hoping my subconscious will allow me to see the perfect cover in a dream—and let me retain it when I wake.

Also, I need to start work on the back cover blurb. Oh, joy! I suck at writing those. I’m still not satisfied with the blurbs for my first two novels. You’d think that since I wrote the books, describing them would be a cinch. Not so, for me. It doesn’t help knowing I’ll have to do this all for two more books in the next few months.

Dang. Where’s a good title, cover, and blurb fairy when you need one?

 

Linda

Illusion and Critique

A bit of news in today’s post. First, since I told you all that my novel An Illusion of Trust was a finalist for a 2014 Best of the Independents eBook Award, I thought I should post an update. As you can see from the graphic, the book won in the General Fiction category!

2014win2If you voted, thank you. If you didn’t vote, maybe you’ll consider reading it. You can use the Look Inside feature or download the Kindle sample here.

This is also the day I submitted my first pages to a new critique group. I believe I mentioned, almost a year ago, that I was taking a Women’s Fiction Writers Association workshop on critique to be placed in a group. Unfortunately, that first group didn’t work out. But now I’m in another group which looks promising.

I’ve worked in live critique groups before, so this online group will be a new experience. We’ve proposed to have discussions via video chat though, so I guess it’s sort of a hybrid. Of course, you know from my last post that I’ll be anxious about the chat thing, but I’m determined to do it.

I’ve now produced three and a third novels without benefit of feedback throughout the writing process, and I’m not in favor of that. I’d prefer to have confidence that when I send my work to my beta readers, it’s nearly polished not something that might need major revision.

To me, it makes sense to have a problem pointed out before it’s been multiplied throughout an entire novel. If several writers agree that there’s a problem with voice or tone or plot, I’d rather consider that change early on.

Speaking of critique, my romantic comedy is out for feedback from a friend and former critique partner. I planned this to be a shorter novel than my first two, but the word count ended up less than I intended, so maybe she’ll be able to point out ways to add length. I don’t want to pad it with filler, of course, but I sometimes forget to put everything I “see” on the page. Then again, maybe it’s meant to be a short, fun read.

As I wait for feedback on my paranormal and my rom-com novels, I’ll continue my women’s fiction WIP. Next year is going to be BIG for me.

Whatever you’re doing this week, I wish you well.

 

Linda

Skype with me at your risk!

Okay, so I asked James Garcia, Jr., a nice guy and accomplished writer, to read and give me feedback on one of my projects. Jimmy, as he’ll ask you to call him, is an extrovert. I am not. Though I would have been satisfied with an email exchange, he wanted to discuss his feedback in person. As it turned out, he didn’t get his way—but neither did I.

James Garcia, Jr.We arranged a Skype session on Saturday night. I’m not much of a Skype person. Previously, I’d used it only to talk to my son and grandchildren who live in a different state. But I combed my hair and showed up. He said he thought I might chicken out and not hit the video call button when he rang me. But hit it I did. Jimmy is used to doing podcasts for his readers to enjoy, so he was relaxed. I drank a glass of wine. And then I babbled, like I always do when I’m nervous.

But we talked about writing in general and we talked about my project specifically. And it made me realize how much I miss being a member of a live writers’ group where you can brainstorm and get immediate answers to questions about feedback and all that good writerly stuff.  I think Jimmy would have ended the call at least thirty minutes earlier than we did, but he couldn’t shut me up.

I ended up with some ideas on how to improve my manuscript and little more social confidence. I don’t know if I’ll ever have the opportunity to Skype with another writer, but I know I could and survive the experience. And if I do it again, I’ll warn the other participant they might need to set a time limit.

So thank you for “pushing” me, Jimmy.

Visit Jimmy’s blog and check out his books.

 

Linda

Taking an Ax to My Old Flame—

While my subconscious works out a problem in my romantic comedy, I’ve been editing the first novel I completed—fourteen years ago. As I read, it became apparent I was a little too fond of the em dash. I think I used at least one on every page. So I decided to run a search for them.

emheartIn a manuscript of 89,000 words, I’d used 543 em dashes! Seriously. Five hundred forty-three. I wouldn’t have thought that possible.

Don’t get me wrong. The em dash is legitimate punctuation. I use it to indicate an interruption, add emphasis, or a sudden change of thought. For instance:

“If you’re asking me to—”

The man—swear to God—had giggled.

She would trust him again—in time.

The party lasted all night—where were you, by the way?

I could use parentheses, colons, and commas in place of some of the em dashes, but my fiction is usually informal, so the dashes fit.

In my defense, I’ve learned a thing or two about writing in fourteen years. I no longer have such a blatant crush on that bit of punctuation. I kept all the em dashes used to indicate interrupted dialogue, but many of the others were not used to good effect and bit the dust. The total now stands at a more reasonable 384, but I still have rounds of editing to do. And I haven’t checked the ellipsis count, yet.

Do you have a punctuation weakness?

 

Linda

Kindle Unlimited and Other News

If you haven’t heard, Amazon has started Kindle Unlimited, a new ebook subscription service that some are dubbing “Netflix for books.” Right now, they’re offering a free 30-day trial. I’m anxious to see how this works out for authors whose books are part of this new service. Since my books are enrolled in Kindle Select, they’re automatically available to Kindle Unlimited subscribers. So if you haven’t read The Brevity of Roses and the sequel An Illusion of Trust, take advantage of the free trial and download them now.

The Brevity of Roses: A man discovers himself through the two women he loves.    AIT_welcome_14

And speaking of those books …

You know those times when you think a task will be simple and quick to accomplish? Yeah, I don’t usually have those. It seems I operate under a different rule—Murphy’s Law maybe? About ten days ago, I got this bright idea to update the interior files for my published books. I wanted to update the cover designer’s name in one book and correct a typo and a punctuation error. No big deal … except.

Except that I can’t take the html that Word creates and upload it directly to KDP or even convert it as is to mobi or epub because I like to use my own CSS style sheet, which has to be fiddled with for each book. Except that I chose a new program to convert my customized html to epub, and I had to learn how to use it first. Except that I couldn’t get the table of contents to work the way I wanted in either ebook. Except that, after conversion, I decided to substitute a different scene break “ornament” in the ebook version of one book. Except that … nah, I’ll spare you the rest. Eventually, I completed the task.

Now that I’ve updated already published novels, it’s time to get back to work on the ones I’m writing now. I had hoped to have the first draft of my romantic comedy completed by the end of this month, but that would take a miracle to accomplish. This month has been more family-focused than usual. I don’t know about you, but I’m at my most productive when I have long stretches of time to settle into writing mode and then keep the story simmering on the back burner during breaks. My usual daily life supports that, but when my routine changes every few days, as it has this month, my creative side retreats.

And since we’re playing hoteliers to three dogs (plus our Maggie) this weekend, I doubt I’ll get much writing done, but for the last few days of July and on into August, I’ll be playing catch up. I believe I said in January that I wouldn’t publish anything this year, but that may not be the case. I might be ready to publish one book before the end of 2014 and then another (or two) in 2015. Maybe I’ll publish some short stories, too. It’s time for me to make a louder noise in this publishing game.

I hope your July has run smoother than mine.

Linda