Editing, Fiction, My Books, Novel, Publish, Reading, Writing

What happened to that beautiful novel I wrote?

Something happened to my eyes during this one last edit before publication. They turned cold. The warm light of love they used to shine on my novel is gone. The experience is disconcerting.

I ask myself repeatedly how, during all my previous edits, I could have missed the things I’m seeing now. Why did I not recognize my addiction to italics? Why did I not realize I had a bit of a crush on em dashes? Why did that horrid syntax not clunk when I read that sentence before? Aloud even?

I’m thankful I’m seeing these things now and not after the book is published. But I’m also weary. I want to get back to writing. I want to live in another novel’s world for a while. I want that excitement.

My publication date is growing closer though. As I’m editing, I’m also working on the cover painting. I thought I had finished it yesterday, but alas, not so. Only a little more work to do though. Then I move to Photoshop to turn it into a book cover. Graphics are not my strong suit, but I have friends I can ask for help, if I need it.

By the way, reading my book on the Kindle has enabled me to see those necessary edits. I’ve also enjoyed reading other books on it, but I confess that I won’t be giving up paper books anytime soon. It’s cool to tuck a library’s worth of books in my purse and go. And it’s true, technically the e-book images are very much like print on paper, easy on the eyes. But the sensory element is missing. I realize the younger generations will never miss that, but I’ve been a book person for a long time. So I’ll still buy books I love in their paper versions … as long as they’re available.


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22 thoughts on “What happened to that beautiful novel I wrote?”

  1. Editing is always never-wracking especially with a deadline looming. I’ve been there too, and it shall pass! Good luck! You know what’s best for your novel.

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  2. Once you are through all of this you will have such a great feeling of accomplishment. I think it’s super cool that you are designing your own cover.

    I’m with you on paper books . I just can’t see myself ever giving them up.

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  3. When we spend so much time reading and re-reading a line or paragraph, our eyes become “blind” to somet things. Sometimes I think it is out of tiredness. When I did my marathon editing last year, which was basically 12 hour days for 2 weeks of nonstop editing, my eyes and brain were so fried, that I missed TONS of errors/mistakes/grammar. I see them now and think “how on earth did I miss THAT?”

    Anyway, enough about my traumas, good to hear that you’re making progress, cannot wait to see what the cover will look like. It’s all so exciting 🙂

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  4. Linda, it happens to all of us! The shine wears off and it’s so scary, isn’t it? Deep breath time. It IS good, every bit as good as it needs to be and it will get even better. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve anxiously sat to re-read a draft with fresh eyes, so excited to be reminded of this wonderful, delightful manuscript I crafted, only to find my heart sinking with each page.

    And you’re so right that getting into a new novel, a new world, does wonders too.

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  5. I’ve found that I need to put a lot of space between readings to keep the luster from wearing off. I wasn’t joking when I said I put a year between the first draft and the first revision. However, I bet when it comes down to the final wire, I’ll be reading my MS over and over until my eyes give out.

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