Formula Writing

In certain genres, some successful authors appear to write to a formula. Certain, some, appear … could that sentence be any vaguer? But it also contains the word successful, though success can also be interpreted in many ways. In this case, I mean those authors sell a lot of books.

formula_m

Part of our goal as authors is to create fans of our work, readers who anticipate and buy our next books. So I imagine those successful authors who write to a formula are not selling each of their books to a new and separate set of readers. No, they have fans who buy all of their books and happily read them.

I’ve heard it said that some of these books are so formulaic that little more than the character names and the locations are changed. I expect that’s exaggeration, but I’m not going to waste my time searching for such books to find out. That’s not the kind of formula I’m seeking for my own writing, anyway.

The basic structure that most novels adhere to is a sort of formula. That structure is intuitive to many writers. Not to me. Knowing that I’m going to have to push, pull, squeeze, or stretch the story I’m writing into that 3-act (or whatever) structure haunts me during the first draft.

I probably shouldn’t be thinking about structure during first drafting, but I can’t help it. I haven’t even settled on an estimated word count for the WIP I’m currently working on. Will it be a novella or novel? That’s one of the reasons I love writing in Scrivener. I go ahead and write the disconnected scenes when they come to me and keep them in a designated folder. When I reach the point where they fit in, I’ll drag them into place.

But I write soooo slowly. I follow a few indie publishing blogs and forums and most of the authors hoping to establish their name (build a fan base), talk about releasing new books every six months—or less. I’ve been working steadily on this WIP for four months and have only 35,000 words written. At that rate, figuring in the writing, editing, revising time, I’ll be lucky to have this book completed in ten months. Add to that a couple of months to prepare for publishing and my start to finish schedule is one year.

I have no ‘day job’ or children under my care, so I can’t complain that I don’t have enough time to write. I do have a health problem that sets me back, but usually only for a day or three at a time. So why am I not more productive?

That’s why I’m wondering about formulas. But I think confidence in my storytelling ability is the formula I’m seeking. If I had that, I’d spend less time stuttering and stammering along in getting that first draft done. And I guess that confidence only comes with time and experience. Which means, I should get back to work. Now.

I wish for all you writers a river of words this week. For you non-writers, I wish for you a week full of whatever you need most.

Linda

15 thoughts on “Formula Writing

  1. I’ve been in your same position. I’m a pantster who wanted to be a plotter, so I tried it. And after writing 35k words, I had to tear the whole thing apart back down to page 3 and start over. I lost the flow, the voice, the whole plot fell apart. Because I was following the outline. I left no room for “what if” which my characters are always telling me.
    And writing fast is detrimental, especially when readers think you can bang out a book every couple of months (which some writers can because they have the time) but when you lose that momentum, or something happens to keep you from publishing, readers get angry. They start to EXPECT a book from you every couple of months and when it’s not forthcoming, they leave.

    Just keep doing what you’re doing Linda. Don’t compare yourself to anyone else. I did and now I’m paying for it.

    Like

    1. Thanks for sharing your experience, Anne. 🙂 Yes, for me too, trying to write to an outline left me frustrated because I knew my characters wanted to veer from it. Luckily, I don’t think I’m going to need to completely start over on my book, though editing will be necessary.

      Compare, compare, compare—that’s always my downfall. Thanks for reminding me to stop that. 🙂

      Like

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