Links, My Books, Promotion

Sell More Kindle Books with Better Links

I’ve been reading book marketing tips for three years, but recently I learned something that made me want to do the “V8” forehead smack. If you sell your ebooks on Amazon, but only link to the book page in your own country, do you know you might be missing sales?

linksI live in the US, but if I click on a Kindlebook link that leads to the Amazon UK page, I won’t be able to buy the ebook. If I’m observant enough, I might see a notice on right-hand of the page telling me I can only shop at Amazon.com. BUT if I click on the link provided, it doesn’t take me to the page for the ebook I was looking at on Amazon UK, no,  it takes me to the Amazon Kindle storefront! It works the same for all Amazon stores.

So, if I post only Amazon US links on my blog or social media accounts hoping to entice readers to buy my ebook I’m probably discouraging or, at least, frustrating my friends and contacts who live outside the US. If they are interested in my ebook and click the US link I provided, they might very well think the book is not available for them to buy. Bad news, right? BUT …

Did you know you can easily create a universal link that will direct the potential buyer to the page for your Kindlebook in their country’s Amazon store?

I know of two free services where you can create these links: BookLinker and SmartURL. I learned about these through this blog post by Jason Matthews, which includes step-by-step videos to show you how it’s done. I used BookLinker and in a couple of minutes had a universal link to use on my blog, social media accounts, and my other Kindlebooks.

BookLinker is simpler to use. You can create an Author page link or Amazon Associate links also.  An advantage to using SmartURL is that you can create a link to your Amazon reviews page and use it in your ebooks to encourage readers to leave a review. So, though my new book link is through BookLinker, I’ll also be creating a review page link through SmartURL and updating my ebooks.

And don’t forget to make a universal link for your print version too. Although Amazon may allow you to buy a print book from any of its stores, who wants to pay international shipping if they don’t have to?

The Brevity of Roses: A man discovers himself through the two women he loves.Okay, so how am I initiating use of my new links? By running a book sale, of course. For the next five days (1-5 September) The Brevity of Roses ebook is free! (Remember Amazon has a free Kindle app, so you don’t have to have a Kindle to read Kindlebooks.)

Illusion_2014_widgetWhat’s better than one sale? Two sales! So also this week, I’ll be running a Kindle Countdown Deal on An Illusion of Trust ebook! The price starts at $.99 cents and will rise to $1.99 midweek before returning to its regular price at midnight PST on Sunday. (UK price will be £ .99 VAT-inclusive for the duration, with the sale ending at midnight GMT on Sunday.)

Go ahead, readers, click my links!

 

Linda

 

Blog Stuff, Links, Writing

The MOST of what comes Out of My Mind

As I said on Tuesday, I received two blog awards, so now I’ll thank Robin Hawke for the second one. Go check out her blog.

By the rules of the 7×7 Link Award first I’m to post links to seven of my previous blog posts, under the following categories of MOST: Beautiful; Helpful; Popular; Controversial; Surprisingly Successful; Underrated; and Pride Worthy.

Well, I’ve written over 500 posts, so to do it well, that task would have required more time than I could devote. My most popular post (judging by the number of page hits and comments) was only so because WordPress decided to Freshly Press that one. And when I sorted my posts by number of comments, I had to eliminate some that were only heavily commented on because I was doing a book giveaway or some such.

And another thing, who’s doing the judging? Is a post considered underrated only because it has few comments or because it didn’t get many hits? Hmmm … I’m doing that over-thinking thing again, aren’t I?

Anyway, I picked out seven posts that might represent the MOSTs. The “most” of what, you decide.

Unmasking the Muse

Passion

My perfect day … and then some

Ten writing rules I obey … and you should too!

Words You Don’t Need

Oops … I embarrassed my mother!

So, what’s the deal with Facebook Pages?

For the second part of this award, I’m supposed to pass it on to seven other bloggers. This part took some thought too, but I decided to choose some I haven’t linked to recently or ever. As usual, it’s up to my awardees to post their 7 Mosts and pass the award on to 7 others or not. Their call. But I’m proud to list my 7. Read their blogs (and books if they’re published), follow them on Twitter or Facebook or wherever. Say hello and tell them Linda sent you.

Go!

Christa Polkinhorn

Kathryn Magendie

E. Victoria Flynn

L.S. Engler

Mary Jean Rivera

Marcia Clarke

Fivecats

Blog Stuff, Links, Writing

From me to you and you and you and ….

Two fellow bloggers cited me for awards this past week, so I’m taking time to say thank you and pass them on. First up, Jennifer Neri, who gave me the Liebster Blog Award. Liebster is German for dearest or beloved and carries the sense of “favorite”.

The rules say to pass it along to five favorite blogs with the stipulation they’re to have less than 200 followers. Unfortunately, I don’t know how many followers most blogs have, so I’ll just bring to your attention some blogs I’ve never cited before, but enjoy reading.

Recipients, do what you will with your award. Feel free to obey or disobey the “rules” of reciprocation or passing along.

At Judith Baxter’s blog Growing Younger Each Day she rages against growing older with humor and great insight.

Chris King‘s blog is named bridgesburning, but I don’t know why. I do know she says a lot of interesting things there.

Victoria, Lisa, and Christi at Writing Up An Appetite combine writing and food, two of my favorite things!

Darlene Foster blogs often about her travels, so it’s probably no surprise that she’s the author of a series of children’s books featuring world travel.

Kate Cardon Parish‘s blog kateschannel is what it sounds like, her show. So go tune into her thoughts on life.

Jessica Luton shares some uplifiting advice on her Serenity Writer blog. And if you follow her on Twitter she’ll inspire your day too.

Hmmm … that’s six, not five. Oh well, I gave you one to grow on. 🙂

I was going to cover both awards today, but that’s a lot of links to throw at you in one sitting, so I’ll leave the second award for the next post. Enjoy the links.

Fiction, Group, Links, Marketing, Opinion, Promotion, Writing

Support your fellow writers!

Not so long ago, I wrote a post where I referred to this community of writers as a tapestry. I’d like to revisit that idea in this post.  We hear a lot of talk about social networking and self-promotion in the publishing industry. Long gone are the days when a writer could simply write and leave the sale of the work to their publisher’s publicity department. Nowadays, unless your name is already a household word, publicizing your published work is mostly up to you.

So here we are, already utilizing one of the best ways we have to publicize. And this is where the tapestry comes into play. If we want the weave to be stable and durable each strand of warp and weft must be strong. Each strand must be of high-quality twist. Single fibers spun together to create a continuous yarn.

Each of us is a fiber. Social networking spins us together. But what weaves that yarn into a tapestry? I believe it’s the support we give one another. Not only by visiting and commenting on each others’ blogs, which is very important for our often fragile egos, but by going the extra mile in promoting each other in these ways:

  • When you find a blog that teaches or blesses you, add a link to it in your Blog Roll.
  • Tweet or reTweet a link to the blog posts that spoke to you.
  • Mention names and link to worthy posts in your blog posts.
  • Remember to trumpet others’ published stories or books if you enjoyed them … or even if you didn’t, but think someone else might.

When I do these things, I help to weave that tapestry. I don’t stand a chance alone against the Big Name Writers. I need your help. You need mine. Working together we each succeed. Otherwise, we might just end up an ugly pile of threads.

In the Spirit of the Tapestry, you’ll notice, over there on the right, I’ve added links to some of my new favorite bloggers: Suzanne, Kirsten, Natasha, Dayner, and Victoria. You’d do well to visit those and my Writer and Poet friends’ blogs. And if any of you on my Blog Roll would prefer being listed under a different name, let me know.

I’d also like to honor a request to promote the Nebraska Summer Writers Conference. There’s a weekend session, June 12-13 or a week long session June 13-18. There will be workshops and classes for writers of fiction, non-fiction/memoir, children’s books, and poetry. Check it out.

Do you know other ways we can help each other get our names out there?

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Advice, Editing, Links, Tips, Writing

It’s a link thing

I’m desperate to wrap up my latest edit and have nothing particularly interesting to write about today, so I’m going to tell you about those who do. I know a lot of us follow the same “industry” blogs, but we may not follow some of the writers’ blogs so I’m sharing a few highlights. So go read, and if you’d like to discuss here any of their topics come on back.

T.A. Olivia, aka Darksculptures, wrote a beautiful piece on how writers are a masochistic nation of people. Excerpt: “We live in this secret society. It’s an independent nation. Rarely do we venture outside our borders. The trek to foreign soil is long, arduous and the neighbors are inhospitable. They don’t like our type.”

Kayla Olson, aka owlandsparrow, shares her color-coded method for editing a novel. Excerpt: “So, what does this editing actually look like? It’s one thing to say, “I read through twenty-five pages and made notes,” but another thing entirely to say how I’m doing that, or what I’m looking for along the way.”

Suzanne Conboy-Hill asks our opinion on using profanity in our writing. Excerpt: “I’ve noticed that none of my characters is inclined to swear. They don’t use profanities any more than I would myself and they would certainly never use that word even in extremis. So am I being prudish, unreal, and disconnected?”

Bonus: here’s one for those of you needing free stock photos to enhance your blog posts: The Morgue File and no, it’s not a collection of gruesome autopsy photos!

Enjoy! I’m going back to work.

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