Illusion and Critique

A bit of news in today’s post. First, since I told you all that my novel An Illusion of Trust was a finalist for a 2014 Best of the Independents eBook Award, I thought I should post an update. As you can see from the graphic, the book won in the General Fiction category!

2014win2If you voted, thank you. If you didn’t vote, maybe you’ll consider reading it. You can use the Look Inside feature or download the Kindle sample here.

This is also the day I submitted my first pages to a new critique group. I believe I mentioned, almost a year ago, that I was taking a Women’s Fiction Writers Association workshop on critique to be placed in a group. Unfortunately, that first group didn’t work out. But now I’m in another group which looks promising.

I’ve worked in live critique groups before, so this online group will be a new experience. We’ve proposed to have discussions via video chat though, so I guess it’s sort of a hybrid. Of course, you know from my last post that I’ll be anxious about the chat thing, but I’m determined to do it.

I’ve now produced three and a third novels without benefit of feedback throughout the writing process, and I’m not in favor of that. I’d prefer to have confidence that when I send my work to my beta readers, it’s nearly polished not something that might need major revision.

To me, it makes sense to have a problem pointed out before it’s been multiplied throughout an entire novel. If several writers agree that there’s a problem with voice or tone or plot, I’d rather consider that change early on.

Speaking of critique, my romantic comedy is out for feedback from a friend and former critique partner. I planned this to be a shorter novel than my first two, but the word count ended up less than I intended, so maybe she’ll be able to point out ways to add length. I don’t want to pad it with filler, of course, but I sometimes forget to put everything I “see” on the page. Then again, maybe it’s meant to be a short, fun read.

As I wait for feedback on my paranormal and my rom-com novels, I’ll continue my women’s fiction WIP. Next year is going to be BIG for me.

Whatever you’re doing this week, I wish you well.

 

Linda

Mélange à trois … encore!

Good things come in threes, right? Well, today I’m sharing three little good things in this short post because I’ve started about five other posts since I published the last one and abandoned them all for one reason or another. By the way, if you misread the title* of this post you’re going to be disappointed. 😉

*The encore appears in the title because I used this silly bit of titillation once before.

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troisScrivener Update:  Recently, I blogged about my first week’s experience with using Scrivener to write and organize all the files associated with a novel. I still love it. I now have projects set up for three novels. It makes me laugh to remember that I didn’t care for the program the first time I tried it. And I expect I’ll be even more pleased with it after I learn all the ins and outs.

Download the free trial, for Mac or Windows, and try it for 30 days!

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Book Covers:  My books are printed by Createspace and, at the time they were published, a glossy cover was my only choice. Now, Createspace offers matte finish as an option. Since, in my opinion, glossy covers are more appropriate for non-fiction or children’s books, I switched to matte and ordered copies for myself. They arrived this past Saturday, and I’m very pleased. For the first time the colors are accurate.

I was never happy with the printed cover of The Brevity of Roses because it had a yellow tint, edging the pink letters of the title toward salmon. Apparently, that was caused by the glossy film overlay because the title appears in a true pink with the matte finish.

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Alpha, beta, critique:  Actually, the correct order is critique, alpha, beta, but it sounds better in A-B-C order. I’m talking about stages of feedback on your writing. One of the reasons I joined Women’s Fiction Writers Association was to find critique partners who write what I write. My first attempt didn’t work out. Of course, since the novel I was working on at that time is now waiting in line and the one I’m currently working on is not women’s fiction, I guess that failed attempt doesn’t matter.

So, again, I’m working without in-progress critique, which means the first person who reads “Forever” will be my alpha reader. I think I have one lined up—she’s a very busy lady, so her availability probably depends on when I have an alpha-ready draft completed. After the alpha edit, I’ll call for betas. But first, I’m writing, writing, writing.

Question of the day: Do you seek A-B-C feedback on your work?

Linda

Do you write women’s fiction?

Have you heard of the Women’s Fiction Writers Association? It’s a non-profit organization for those who write … well, I guess you figured that out. Their new site went live on September 9 and was jammed temporarily by so many writers trying to join at once. I’m now a proud member too.

wfwa_logo_smAll writers of women’s fiction are welcome: multi-published, debut, and aspiring. Among other things, the association will offer mentorship, critique groups, forums, online workshops, contests, and agent/editor pitch opportunities for members. They’ll also have an annual retreat.

The WFWA’s About Us statement:

We began this organization in 2013 with the idea to create a safe, nurturing place for male and female writers of women’s fiction. The publishing industry is morphing – with new opportunities and, as yet, unknown futures. Some of us came from the Romance Writers of America, where a shift of focus left many of us out in the rain. The founders of the Women’s Fiction Writers Association wanted somewhere to amass and disseminate information to and about our chosen genre.

Defining Women’s Fiction has proven as subjective as the types of books we prefer. For that reason, our guiding statement is broad and comprehensive:

An inclusive organization of writers who create stories about a woman’s emotional journey.

 Our stories may have romance. Or they may not. They could be contemporary. Or historical. But what binds us together is the focus on a woman’s emotional journey.

As you may know, I’ve struggled with the definition of women’s fiction. It’s a very broad category, ranging from chick lit to near literary—but not straight romance. Not everything I write would be categorized as WF. Some would exclude my first published novel, but though Jalal dominates The Brevity of Roses, it’s definitely about Meredith’s and Renee’s emotional journeys as well as his. An Illusion of Trust, the sequel to Brevity, squares firmly with the WFWA definition, as will my next novel.

So, even if you don’t write women’s fiction exclusively, you’re still welcome to join us. Us. Yay! I’m excited to be a part of WFWA. And self-published authors are not considered second class citizens in this group. Another yay!

Linda